Tag Archives: Bright

Residents of 517 A in Boyd’s Directory

1 May 2016

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[Originally posted 5 January 2014; revised 1 May 2016. The most recently added information is highlighted in green.]

The following persons appear in Boyd’s Directory of the District of Columbia at 517 A Street, SE:

[1877] James Cross (clerk).

[1878] James Cross (clerk).

[1880] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1881] Thomas McK. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1883] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1884] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1885] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1886] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1887] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department).

[1886] Thomas M. McNeely (clerk, Treasury Department). [McNeely died soon thereafter, because in the 1892 directory Mary E. McNeely is listed as his widow and is living at 321 B St., SE.]

[1890] Joseph C. Tappan (clerk); William F. Tappan (printer); William S. Tappen (jeweler).

[1892] Clarence J. Tappan (jeweler); William F. Tappan (printer).

[1894] Julia M. Rawlings (teacher); Henry J. Bright (clerk).

[1895] August B. S. Rawlings; Julia M. Rawlings (teacher); Henry T. Bright (clerk); Henry J. Bright.

[1896] Augustus B. Rawlings; J. May Rawlings (teacher); Henry J. Bright.

[1897] Mary J. Rollins [sic] (teacher).

[1898] Henry J. Bright; Julia M. Rawlings (teacher).

[1899] Henry T. Bright (Colhoun & Bright).

[1900] Julia M. Rawlings (teacher); Staughton A. B. Rawlings.

[1901] Henry J. Bright (clerk); Julia M. Rawlings (principal).

[1902] Henry J. Bright (clerk, Navy yard); Henry T. Bright (patents).

[1903] Harry J. Bright (clerk, Navy Yard); Henry J. Bright; Henry T. Bright (patents); Julia May Rawlings (principal).

[1904] Henry T. Bright (patent attorney); H. J. Bright (clerk, Navy Yard).

[1905] Julia M. Rawbridge [sic] (principal); Henry T. Bright (patent attorney).

[1906] Henry J. Bright (clerk); Gladys Offut (milliner).

[1907] Henry J. Bright (time clerk, Navy Yard); Henry T. Bright (clerk, The Lambert); Emily Genella (widow of William Genella).

[1908] Joseph A. Flynn (clerk).

[1909] Joseph A. Flynn (ticket examiner); E. W. Vaden (Navy Yard); Clarence C. Vaden (machinist).

[1910] Clarken W. Baden (Navy Yard);

[1911] George H. Woodruff; Mary J. Hickey (clerk).

[1912] Louis T. Gronberg (Navy Yard); Joseph F. Henderson (Navy Yard).

[1914] Grover F. Tolson (glazier); Elbert W. Pyles (salesman, boards).

[1915] Grover F. Tolson (glazier).

[1916] Mary E. Danks (clerk, Treasury Department); Cornelia I. Mathins [?] (principal, Maury School); Grover F. Tolson (glazier).

[1917] James P. Porter.

[1920] Julian Grubbs.

[1922] Thomas L. Bohannon (meats, Eastern Market); Myron L. Bohannon (electrician).

[1923] Thomas L. Bohannon (meats, Eastern Market); Myron L. Bohannon (electrician); Julian Grubbs (machinist).

[1925] Samuel S. Taylor; Samuel S. Reidy.

[1928] Vacant.

[1932] Michael P. Fee.

[1934] Mrs. Ida M. Phillips.

[1936] George E. Warren.

[1956] Edward J. O’Donnell.

[1967] J. Stephen Lord.

[1973] W. Milne Holton.

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Henry J. Bright: obituary (Washington Times)

23 January 2014

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Washington Times, 4 June 1906, p. 12.

[Bright had lived at 517 A Street, S.E.]

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Henry J. Bright: death

2 January 2014

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“Guiteau Juror Is Dead.” Washington Post, 5 June 1906, p. 5.

“Henry Jackson Bright, one of the few survivors of the famous Guiteau jury, died yesterday at his home in the Lambert Flats, on A street northeast. Mr. Bright had suffered nearly three years from heart trouble supplemented by bright’s disease and dropsy.

“He will be buried to-morrow from his late home. The funeral will be under the auspices of the Masonic lodge, of which he was a member. Burial will be in Congressional Cemetery.

“Mr. Bright was seventy-eight years old. He was born near Alexandria, Va., but in his early youth moved to this city. At the age of twenty-one he engaged in the shoe business on what was then known as Capitol Hill, and he continued there till about twenty years ago, when he retired from business.

“He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Carroll Bright, one son, Henry Bright, and one daughter, Mrs. Julia M. Rawlings, all of this city.”

[He lived earlier at 517 A Street, SE.]


“Died.” Washington Post, 4 June 1906, p. 3.

“BRIGHT—On Monday, June 4, 1906, at 1 a.m., Henry Jackson Bright, in the seventy-eighth year of his age.

“Notice of funeral hereafter.”

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Henry Bright: 1900 census

1 January 2014

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Federal census, 1900, Washington, D.C. (Dist. 126, p. 34). 517 A Street, SE.

  • Henry Bright, head, white, male, b. Feb. 1829, 71, married for 41 years, b. in D.C., parents b. in Va.
  • Mary E. Bright, wife, white, female, b. Dec. 1835, 64, married for 41 years, mother of 3 children (1 living), b. in D.C., father b. in Va., mother b. in Md.
  • Julia A. Rawlings, niece, white, female, b. Feb. 1864, 30, single, b. in D.C., father b. in Md., mother b. in D.C., public school teacher.
  • A. B. Stoughton [Rawlings], nephew, white, male, b. Aug. 1869, 30, single, b. in D.C., father b. in Md., mother b. in D.C., [no occupation].
  • Henry T. Bright, son, white, male, b. Sept. 1875, 24, single, b. in D.C., parents b. in D.C., patent attorney.
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Henry J. Bright: will

1 January 2014

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Washington Post, 13 June 1906, p. 11

“Mary E. Bright is to receive the entire estate of her husband, Henry J. Bright, by the terms of his will, dated October 3, 1897, and offered yesterday for probate. Mrs. Bright is also to act as executrix.”

[Bright lived at 517 A Street, SE.]

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Henry J. Bright: interview

21 December 2013

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“Was on Guiteau Jury: Henry J. Bright, One of Four Surviving Members.” Washington Post, 1 September 1905, p. 2.

[Lived at 517 A St. SE]

“Henry J. Bright, one of the few remaining members of the famous jury which tried Guiteau for the killing of President Garfield, is lying seriously ill of heart trouble at his residence on the corner of A and Sixth street southeast. For over two years past Mr. Bright has been an invalid, and confined to his room of an affection of the cardiac region, although prior to that time he had always enjoyed excellent health, being a man of robust physique and strong constitution. Fears for the worst are entertained by his family, his condition having grown steadily worse for the past several days.

“Mr. Bright is a native of Washington, having been born in this city in 1829. He is now in his seventy-sixth year. Although in extremely delicate health, his mind is clear, and to a Post reporter who called at his residence last evening he talked interestingly of the Guiteau trial, and the assassination of President Garfield.

“According to Mr. Bright, there are, aside from himself, only three survivors of the Guiteau jury. These are Lieutenant John Hammond, of the Capital police, stationed in the Senate wing of that building, and residing at 1433 N street northwest. Mr. Hammond was the foreman of the Guiteau jury. The other two are George Gates, an employe of the Navy Yard, residing on Eleventh street southeast, and William Brawner, employed at the District Building.

Thinks Guiteau Was Sane.

“Speaking of his impressions of this celebrated trial, Mr. Bright said very emphatically that of all popular fallacies, the notion that Guiteau was mentally deranged was the worst. He was, according to Mr. Bright, who was very emphatic on the subject, not only clear-headed and sane in a remarkable degree, but, what was more, he was shrewd and intelligent into the bargain.

“At the time, he stated, that Guiteau’s attorney was pressing the plea of insanity, one of the reporters of the Brooklyn Eagle discovered an article which Guiteau had written for that paper some years before he assassinated President Garfield. This the reporter showed to various persons about the courthouse who believed Guiteau insane, challenging them to find a single incoherent or ambiguous sentence in the article from start to finish. Mr. Bright entertains the notion that Guiteau’s motive for assassinating Garfield was simply disappointment over his failure to obtain an appointment at his hands.

Photographed with the Jury.

“When the Post reporter sought to obtain a photograph of Mr. Bright, he replied humorously that he had never had one taken in his life, although during the trial the newspaper men managed to photograph both him and other members of the the jury, so that, despite his reluctance to be photographed, his features became, at one time, familiar to every citizen of the United States through the medium of the press. His family are trying now to prevail upon him to be photographed.

“Prior to his illness, Mr. Bright was for years an employe of the Navy Yard. He has a wife, a lady well advanced in years; a son, Henry Bright, a patent attorney, having an office in the Warder building, corner of Ninth and F street northwest, and an adopted daughter.”

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Henry J. Bright: obituary

21 December 2013

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Washington Evening Star, 5 June 1906, p. 16.

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[He lived at 517 A Street, SE.]

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Henry J. Bright: ill

10 December 2013

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Washington Post, 6 May 1906, p. 2.

[Name should be Henry J. Bright.]

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GUITEAU JUROR VERY LOW
Little Hope Felt for Recovery of William Bright.
Aged Man One of Two Survivors of the Body that Convicted Garfield’s Assassin.

William Bright, of 517 A street southeast, one of the two survivors of the jury that tried and convicted Guiteau for the assassination of President Garfield, is reported in a very critical condition, and fears of his death are entertained by his relatives. Mr. Bright, who is well advanced in years, has been confined to his room for the last two years by a wasting illness, and early last fall he was not expected to live. He rallied, however, but of late his condition has grown steadily worse.

Lieut. John Hammond, of the Capitol Police, is the only other survivor of the Guiteau jury.

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Henry J. Bright: gravely ill

10 December 2013

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“Guiteau Juror in Critical Condition.” Washington Post, 10 September 1905, p. 9.

“Henry J. Bright, who, as already stated, is one of the few remaining survivors of the jury that tried Guiteau for the assassination of President Garfield, was reported last evening in an extremely critical condition, he having shown no improvement since Wednesday.”

[Lived at 517 A St. SE]

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